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More Stunning Entries from the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

It’s not too late to enter the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The categories for this annual competition are Landscape, Environmental Issues, Action, and Animal Portraits, and so far, the contest has received incredible submissions in each group. As the contest website indicates, photographs can be “a powerful wildlife shot, a stunning landscape, or a look at a complicated environmental issue—whatever nature means to you.” Photographers have certainly taken advantage of this conceptual freedom to capture the vibrant, unrestrained beauty of our world.

As always, there are great awards for the winners of the contest. The top prize will receive a 10-day trip for two at the Galápagos Islands with National Geographic Expeditions, along with two 15 minute portfolio reviews with the photo editors at National Geographic. Each of the four categories will also award first, second, and third place winners with corresponding prizes, and the winning photographs will be published on National Geographic’s website.

Below are some of the spectacular submissions that have been entered into the competition. You can view more entries online and even submit your own photos—but be quick, the deadline for entries is November 4, 2016!

Above photo: Bubbles by Brett Monroe Garner, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
A green sea turtle at the surface off the coast of Oahu.

Shira-Ito-no-taki by Masai Okeda, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
Shirato no Taki, Fujinomiya,Shizuoka, Japan

Adelie Penguin Jumping Between Ice Floes by Nick Dale, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
I saw these Adelie penguins jumping into the water at Brown Bluff on the Antarctic Peninsula. By the time I sat down on the beach to take a picture, they’d starting jumping to the next ice floe. Paul Goldstein says the Holy Trinity of wildlife photography is ‘dust, air and spume’, and this shot captures the ‘air’ bit!

Walking in Silence by M. Engelmann, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
A typical african evening. Nothing special in Nxai Pan, Kalahari, Botswana.

Harvest by Laura Barnett, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
I loved the half-unfurled sunflower on a friend’s porch. As I leaned in to take a photo, a bee flew in for some pollen.

Life and Death by Vadim Balakin, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
These polar bear remains have been discovered at one of the islands of Northern Svalbard. Unfortunately we do not know definitely wether the bear died from starving or aging, but more likely if we see the good teeth status – from starving . They say nowadays such remains to be founded very often – global warming and ice situation influence the polar bear population a lot. Svalbard, Norway, august 2014.

Curiosity by John Pennell, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
A bald eagle and a river otter check each other out on a hollow log in Potter Marsh outside Anchorage, Alaska.  The otter was one of a trio that continued to investigate the raptor for more than an hour before losing interest and leaving to chase fish.

On Top of the World by Eugene Kitsios, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year  
A pair of Atlantic puffins enjoy the last bit of sunlight over the cliffs of L·trabjarg in Iceland.

Ijen Volcano by Heidi Ouyang, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
The sulfur mine in the early morning. The long pipe has been installed into the fumaroles to collect the hot, liquid sulfur which drips out and solidifies as it cools. The sulfur dioxide gas at the mine site is very strong.

Stare Into My Eyes by Octoyura Bamahry, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
This picture is taken in Bandung while this animal shows it’s beautiful Symmetrical feather while I’m taking a picture of it using my Leica. it seems that he wants to mate, but… hmn, than he dance, shaking it’s feather. I love it’s natural hypnotizing color. The green peacock is one endangered bird from Indonesia. Usually, their feather are taken for house decoration. With photography, everyone can enjoy it’s beauty without endangering it. Just Print it or save it on your desktop computer.

Laguna Tuyajto by Victor Lima, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
Located in the Atacama Desert, Chile, this place is a spectacle of nature. The pond floor is formed by salt. The small formations are due to action of microorganisms that for thousands of years feed on the nutrients present there.

Alien Lights by Russell Wiltshire, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
Auroral beams dance over the Bass Strait, on the southern coastline of mainland Australia. The auroral light reflects off the calm seas, and starlight reflects from the rock pools on the sea shore.

The Big One by Giacomo Marchione, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
Beautiful whale shark swims to the surface in search of plankton but it is completely wrapped of remores.

The One That Got Away by Steve Grodin, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
Brown bear chasing a salmon.

Dancing in the Rain by Vladislav Kamenski, 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year
Fox caught in action under the rain.

National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year: Website | Your Shot
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My Modern Met granted permission to use photos and captions by National Geographic.

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