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“Chernobyl: A Stalker’s Paradise” – Photographer Vladimir Migutin Captures The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone In Infrared

Pripyat is a ghost town in Ukraine, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as a monument to the most terrible nuclear catastrophe in world history. We have already seen him many times, but never before in such an unusual form.

Vladimir Migutin is a photographer specializing in infrared photography. These photographs were taken during a 2-day trip to the exclusion zone of Chernobyl using a 590-nm infrared filter from Kolari Vision.

The idea to close the razor-shaped vent of the reactor arose almost immediately after the explosion. In order to build the Sarcophagus over the ChNPP it took 7,000 tons of metal structures and 400,000 meters of cubic mixtures of concrete. And in order for the territory to be completely disinfected, more than 90,000 cubic meters of soil were removed.

“We always hear praises of the might of Mother Nature, how it renders useless mans’ creations, and bears life above the ruins. Well, it’s something that is always felt, but never on such a huge scale. This place IS the place for these contrasts. It’s pretty hard to describe the overall atmosphere I experienced during this trip. Despite the events of 1986, the ruins, and the rust, I didn’t have grim feelings while traveling there. On the contrary, it felt like I was in a “kind of” paradise on a different planet,” says Vladimir.

More info: Kolari Vision, Instagram














The post “Chernobyl: A Stalker’s Paradise” – Photographer Vladimir Migutin Captures The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone In Infrared appeared first on Design You Trust.

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