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20+ Spectacular Photos From the Rare Total Solar Eclipse Across the U.S.

Location: Madras, Oregon
Photo: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

On August 21, 2017, people across the United States looked to the sky to witness a rare total solar eclipse. This was the first time in 99 years that the Moon had seemingly swallowed the Sun and was visible from coast to coast. Starting near Salem, Oregon and spanning to Charleston, South Carolina, there was an arched path of 100% totality, meaning that whomever was along it could see the entire thing event perfectly. During this magical time, people from all walks of life were transfixed on the sky (and hopefully wearing protective eye wear).

For those who weren’t able to catch a glimpse of this celestial sight—or simply want to relive it—photographers captured history in spectacular astrophotography. Depending on the location of the photographer, the total solar eclipse looks different. For those in the 100% totality zone, the moon is dark and outlined in a brilliant illuminated ring. Any less totality yielded a crescent moon lit in a fiery orange—still an amazing thing to witness nonetheless.

No matter where you were in the U.S., however, the International Space Station had the best vantage point of all. Astronauts there had a crystal clear view as they cross its path three times from an altitude of 250 miles.

Although you needed special glasses for the eclipse, you can gaze at these stunning total solar eclipse photos for as long as you like.

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Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Idaho
Photo: James West

2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Location: Madras, Oregon
Photo: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

Photos of Solar Eclipse

Location: Aboard Alaska Airlines
Photo: Michael Barratt via NASA Astronauts

2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Location: City of Greenbrier, Tennessee
Photo: Dave Krugman

Total Solar Eclipse

Location: Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Photo: @bryanminear

Photos of Solar Eclipse

Photo: NASA

Photos of Solar Eclipse

Location: Aboard Alaska Airlines
Photo: Michael Barratt via NASA Astronauts

Total Solar Eclipse

Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Photo: @karl_shakur

Total Solar Eclipse

Location: New Zion, South Carolina
Photo: @matt2harrington

Photos of Solar Eclipse

Location: Banner, Wyoming
Photo: NASA / Joel Kowsky

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico
Photo: Robert Minchin

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico
Photo: Robert Minchin

Total Solar Eclipse

Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Photo: @richardsparkmanproductions

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: New York, New York
Photo: @samalive

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Seattle, Washington
Photo: @hillarykennedy92

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Photo: Zackery Ellis

Total Solar Eclipse

Location: New Zion, South Carolina
Photo: @matt2harrington

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Photo: @facetedphoto

Photos of Solar Eclipse

Location: Aboard Alaska Airlines
Photo: Michael Barratt via NASA Astronauts

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Green River Lake, Wyoming
Photo: Ben Cooper

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Tennessee
Photo: Janine Marie Tobias

Total Solar Eclipse 2017

Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Photo: Robert Anthony Byrne

Total Solar Eclipse

Location: Casper, Wyoming
Photo: Morteza Safataj

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The post 20+ Spectacular Photos From the Rare Total Solar Eclipse Across the U.S. appeared first on My Modern Met.

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